Hi! I'm asking what is probably going to be something difficult to discuss. I just wanted an outside opinion besides my own. Do you think the phrase "Everyone can be this good if they just work as hard as I do." falls into ableist thinking? Why or why not? Personally I feel like it is often used in an ableist manner. Excluding or ignoring the effort many disabled artists put into their work. You don't have to answer this is if its uncomfortable in any way, and I hope that you're feeling better!

3liza:

hm. I’m not a good person to ask about this; I’m too privileged to have any expertise in whether a thing is ableist or not. I’m going to publish this because i do have a lot of disabled or differently-abled artists and craftspeople following me who can give you a much more authoritative answer if they feel like it.  I will say that even aside from the question of ableism, I think the “bootstraps” worldview is poisonous in general, not to mention unrealistic + ahistorical. It also frames the speaker’s definition of “this good” as some sort of objective goal, which is sensical only in the context of capitalism.

I can say as an artist and an armchair academic (as if that bestows any kind of authority) that the definition of “good art” or even “skill” is useful only contextually, either to the speaker or in the framework of critical analysis of an artist or works, or a genre, etc. Being “good” at new yorker cartoons doesn’t require you to have a strong grasp of draftsmanship or anatomy. It might help you to convey an idea, but then again it might not. likewise, being a competent author of droll one-liners isn’t going to win you any prizes at the National Portrait Gallery’s annual competition, but forty years of grueling anatomical and still life studies probably will.

i can also say, with authority born of experience in my “chosen” career, that literally every piece of visual media has an audience. no matter how crude, unpracticed, cartoonish, stylized, or abstract. it is one of the wonderful things about living in the modern era imo—representational art is still a valid field, but it’s not the only bitch on the block anymore. some of my favorite artists right now are working with a style that any high school art teacher would dismiss as “crude” or “unpracticed”, nothing your grandma would even put on her fridge. i’m not going to conclude this paragraph by saying “…and it doesn’t matter”, because it absolutely does matter—it’s part of what that artist has to say, regardless of whether they wish they were “better” at traditional anatomy and draftsmanship or not.

What I’m trying to say is, I believe now that all art is inherently valid and valuable. However “bad” or unpopular or amateur or vapid or beautiful or pregnant with meaning, and regardless of how much I hate or like it, and regardless also of how morally or politically sound it is, someone is going to love it. Even in my own limited oeuvre, so many people are attached to paintings and drawings of mine that I think are just abject garbage. So our tastes disagree—so what? I made a thing and someone likes it. It gives them some satisfaction, it makes their lives better in an infinitesimal way. That’s good enough for me. It’s okay to act as a conduit for a thing you may not understand or appreciate. And it took me a long fuckin’ time to figure that out.

jekunchocobo:

So I saw this Cecil generator thing, and drew a few!

(There are captions, you should read them yep.)

Stop wearing wooly vests in the desert, Cecil. You’re going to overheat.

(Source: jekunchocobo)

I'm Glasses: Disney's Pool of Light and Background Theory →

notzilon:

Something I’ve been reading up on recently in my quest to provide backgrounds for my drawings is Disney’s focus on pools of light in backgrounds, the idea being that backgrounds, while important and containing valuable information, are set pieces. A background on its own isn’t really complete - it’s a stage without actors. The pool of light refers to the area that is supposed to catch the viewer’s attention, it’s where most of the action in the scene will take place and where the majority of the important information for the viewer is located. Essentially, to continue the theater stage metaphor, it’s the spotlight of your composition.

Cinderella has some really, really excellent examples of this in its background paintings:

image

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These are some more blatant examples, but will work for what I wish to talk about, in that this theory comes down to two things: color and shape.

COLOR

The pool of light deals not just with making an area in the scene brighter or lighter than another, it focuses on contrasts. While dark/light is part of this, there’s also the contrasts of tone, hue, and saturation. In Cinderella’s palette, this is consistently different warm grays used as the light, while dark blues are used as the shadow. When viewed on a color wheel, the colors are often near-complementary, but not exactly:

image

What’s important to take away from this is that these colors blend into every object, which allows the whole composition to appear consistent. 

image

Of course, the shadows/hilights don’t have to be the traditional warm light/cool shadows. This is just what the example uses.

SHAPE

Secondly, and just as important, is the shape of the light itself - because it shows exactly where the character will be moving, and what we should be focusing on. Even when not in animation, this is surprisingly effective. For example, look at the two screenshots of the stairs - would you expect Cinderella to go down the stairs, or across towards the rafters? Would she bring the breakfast up the stairs, or across the hall?

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What’s fascinating is that this is absolutely everywhere in old Disney movies and shorts. Literally every background uses this concept. It’s not something you really think about while viewing the film, but as an artist, the ideas employed by these movies are incredibly useful.

(All screencaps used in this post are from disneyscreencaps, which is also a great place to research this further.)

fishingboatproceeds:

devildoll:

are you fucking kidding me

This was created by the brilliant Judith Ann Braunn. Those of you lucky enough to live in or near Indianapolis can see an original (and definitionally temporary*) fingerprint graphite work created by Braunn at the Indianapolis Museum of Art as part of GRAPHITE, a show curated by none other than my wife.

It’s really encouraging to see good contemporary art getting >100,000 notes on tumblr, particularly because everyone is always telling me that no one is interested in contemporary art.

the-fandoms-are-cool:

thegirlofeternalbalance:

my-future-is-bulletproof:

Art is the Weapon

I THOUGHT IT WAS JUST CRAYONS BUT THEN IT WASN’T

IT’S A WEAPON OF MASS CREATION

the-fandoms-are-cool:

thegirlofeternalbalance:

my-future-is-bulletproof:

Art is the Weapon

I THOUGHT IT WAS JUST CRAYONS BUT THEN IT WASN’T

IT’S A WEAPON OF MASS CREATION

(via specspectacle)

emmyc:

Stumbled across this video and loved it. It’s a step-by-step look at Andrew Loomis’s head construction technique, which is my FAVORITE way to construct realistic head proportions at any angle.

Looking at reference for realism is always a must, but every artist should know the basics of constructing a head from memory! It’ll enhance your realism AND cartoony styles a hundred-fold, trust me! Same goes for body construction, which I hope this youtuber will touch upon at some point! YAY LOOMIS

Wow, this is a super simple way of looking at heads and facial proportions that I did not know about! Useful stuff.

jekunchocobo:

Dumps the rest in a set.

Oh wow tumblr please stop awkwardly resizing things this is why I usually just make text posts with image inserts instead of photosets.

Psi, your cheekbones may be endangering Suf there.

jekunchocobo:

Let’s say this a nod to the ladyfest going on that I haven’t done any pinch hits for because they’re all super writey and and and

Nod.

<3

jekunchocobo:

Stand by for spam of two fifths of the pictures I drew on the one day I was staying with my grandparents.

you guys have no idea how hard I ship the cahootsprits
no
idea

jekunchocobo:

Stand by for spam of two fifths of the pictures I drew on the one day I was staying with my grandparents.

you guys have no idea how hard I ship the cahootsprits

no

idea